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5 Things All Facilities Engineers and Managers Should Include in Their CV

Hiring tips, Job Search Support

Joanne Crampton, Head of Thorn Baker Estates, Facilities & MaintenancePM Boris Johnson has announced the most radical reforms to our planning system since the Second World War. So if you’re looking for a new project to get stuck into now could be the perfect time to spruce up your CV and we’ve got 5 top tips on what all Facilities Engineers and Managers should be including in their CV’s.

Joanne Crampton, Head of Thorn Baker Estates, Facilities & Maintenance

 

There’s no shortage of CV writing tutorials, we understand that as a busy Facilities Engineer or Manager you just don’t have time to wade through all of the advice. So we’ve put together a quick top 5 tips on what to include in your CV.

1. Profile: simple and to the point

It is important to keep this section brief and to focus on your experience and personality. Using generalised comments such as “I am a hardworking, pro-active, honest person” won’t make you stand out - everybody says that (but you’re not everyone!)

This section is your chance to demonstrate what makes you uniquely suitable for the roles you’re applying for. Try turning the tables, if you were hiring what would you be looking for in that person?

You should always include:

  • Skills that are significant to the role you are applying for
  • Personality traits that would benefit the job and the company
  • Areas or sectors you’ve worked in previously that are similar to the project

Remember the person hiring may have to read a lot of CV’s. Simple, clear, and to the point. Avoid CV cliché’s and you’ll help yourself to stand out in the crowd.

2. Skills/Expertise: expand but keep it relevant

Do you feel like you have more skills to talk about but you couldn’t get them into your profile? This is the perfect place to put them.

Bullet points are your friend here, list out all of your skills that would perfect for the role. Again keep it relevant and bear in mind the person reading this, it’s a great area to make their life easier.

3. Education/Qualifications – keep it simple

This might feel more significant if you’re looking to get your foot on the career ladder, but it’s important to include this information whatever your level. Reference as a simple, chronological list: what you studied, where, and when.

You don’t need to include all of your GCSE/ O Levels. Keep it concise, for example, Eight GCSE’s inclusive of Maths and English. Those are the two main things people are looking for so make reading your CV simpler where you can.

4. Experience: consistent and mind the gaps

This should be brief and chronological. You don’t need to go in-depth on every project you’ve been involved in or the company you’ve worked for. A good idea is to focus on your last five projects or the last three companies, include your other work history but expand on these.

Again make use of bullet points rather than lengthy descriptions.

Highlight the major achievements of your job. Did you complete the project on time/ early? Was it on budget? What kind of budgets are you used to working with?

A simple format that will hit all of the bases is:

  • Dates
  • Company name (if you used an agency ensure you use the company name, not the agency)
  • Job title
  • Key duties and projects

Be sure to include any promotions, they’re achievements and companies want to know what you have done successfully.

5. References: show that you’re confident

Don’t be afraid to name people on your CV. Add their job title as well, if you’re not comfortable adding phone numbers just say that you can supply contact details on request